Australian Terrier Dog

  Animals

The Australian Terrier is a small breed of dog of the terrierdog type.The Australian Terrier was developed in Australia, as his name implies. Bred to hunt and exterminate rodents and snakes, Australian Terriers were also prized as watchdogs and companions.

The Australian Terrier, called an “Aussie” by his admirers (although he’s not to be confused with an Australian Shepherd), is a small terrier with upright ears and a rough, shaggy coat. He is the littlest of the working terriers, but don’t let his size fool you. He’s definitely a lot of dog in a tiny package, with a typical terrier slant on life: tenacious, independent, hardworking, and lively.

Development of the breed began in Australia about 1820, and the dogs were at first called the Rough Coated Terrier. The breed was officially recognized in 1850, and later renamed as the Australian Terrier in 1892. The Australian Terrier was shown at a dog show for the first time in 1906 in Melbourne, and was also shown in Great Britain about the same time.

The Kennel Club (UK) recognized the breed in 1933. The American Kennel Clubrecognized the Australian Terrier in 1960, and the United Kennel Club (US) in 1970. It is now recognized by all of the kennel clubs in the English speaking world, and also is listed by various minor kennel clubs and other clubs and registries.

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There are three completed health surveys for Australian Terriers. Two surveys, one in 1997 and one in 2002, have been conducted by the Australian Terrier Club of America. The Club is currently collecting data for their next survey. The UK Kennel Club has a 2004 survey, but it has a much smaller sample size than the Australian Terrier Club of America surveys. Some of the respondents in the American surveys were from Australia, but there is no separate Australian health survey.

Terriers are often too quick to sound the alarm at every new sight and sound. You have to be equally quick to stop them. If you work all day and have close neighbors, terriers are not the best choice for you. For the same reason, terriers should NEVER be left outside in your yard, unsupervised. To make matters worse, some terriers have high-pitched barks that can set your teeth on edge.

It is an alert, amusing and loveable little dog. Spirited, curious, and self-assured, it has very keen hearing and eyesight, making an excellent watchdog. It wants to please its master and is more easily obedience trained than most other terriers.

This breed is not snappish. It likes to bark, and must be told after it first alerts you of something, enough is enough, no more barking. An Australian Terrier that is pack leader of its humans may snap at children. Children need to be taught how to be kind to the dog, but also how to be the dog’s leader.

They are friendly with other dogs as well as other pets. However they may chase small animals outside the house and should be in a safe area at all times. Socialize this breed well. This is a good dog to travel with.

The training of the Australian Terrier needs to be strict because this self-confident dog prefers to follow its own ideas, although it learns very quickly. The Australian Terrier is a very economical breed to feed. Make sure you are this dog’s firm, confident, consistent pack leader to avoid Small Dog Syndrome, human induced behaviour problems, along with territorial issues.

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