Burj Al Arab Hotel, Dubai

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Burj Al Arab is a luxury 5 Star hotel located in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. It has been called “The world’s only 7 star Hotel” and is the third tallest hotel in the world; however, 40% of its total height is made up of non-occupiable space. It is said to be the second tallest hotel in the world.

 

The tallest hotel building is the Rose Tower. The architecture who designed the Burj Al Arab was Tom Wright of Atkins. The hotel has 202 rooms and the construction was completed in the year 1999.

 

There is another building that is still unfinished and is nine times taller than the Burj Al Arab. Burj Al Arab was designed by architect Tom Wright of WKK Architects. The design and construction were managed by Canadian engineer Rick Gregory of WS Atkins.

 

Construction of the Island began in 1994. Two “wings” spread in a V to form a vast “mast”, while the space between them is enclosed in a massive atrium. Burj Al Arab has attracted criticism as well “a contradiction of sorts, considering how well-designed and impressive the construction ultimately proves to be.”

 

The contradiction here seems to be related to the hotel’s decor. “This extraordinary investment in state-of-the-art construction technology stretches the limits of the ambitious urban imagination in an exercise that is largely due to the power of excessive wealth.”

 

Another critic includes negative critiques for the city of Dubai as well: “both the hotel and the city, after all, are monuments to the triumph of money over practicality.

 

In the present day, the hotels in Dubai have more stars than the Milky Way. The roads run smooth and are stocked with fluorescent hypercars and murdered out Mercedes Gelandewagens. Construction cranes sway in the gentle Arabian breeze next to impossibly tall buildings.

 

The malls have ski slopes and aquariums with neat little Guinness World Record plaques. Man-made islands shaped like palm trees maximize beach front real estate just offshore.

 

It is a place where the compendium of engineering knowledge has been plundered, nudging the limits of man-made extravagance into open space. Built to resemble the sail of a dhow, the Burj Al Arab encountered bleeding edge engineering issues with erecting such a large structure (over 1.2 million square feet) on a man-made island.

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It took over two years to just build the foundation, which included placing large rocks in a honeycomb pattern and setting deep foundation using hundreds of 130 foot foundation piles.

 

The Burj Al Arab provides an onslaught of opulence. It is at once superfluous, tasteless, beautiful, modern, offensive, and insane. And very gold, it is what Vegas would look like if it was a real place and not just a corporate facsimile of fame and luxury.

 

This extraordinary investment in state-of-the-art construction technology stretches the limits of the ambitious urban imagination in an exercise that is largely due to the power of excessive wealth.”

 

Another critic includes negative critiques for the city of Dubai as well: “both the hotel and the city, after all, are monuments to the triumph of money over expediency.